Shirlington library speed dating best and worst online dating sites

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Growing up in Arlington, Megan Donnelly never imagined she would one day be a divorced mother, navigating the singles scene here in her 40s.

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Diane Kresh has been the director of Arlington’s libraries since April 2006. Kresh may not be able to answer every question asked.

An Arlington native and Yorktown High School grad who got her first library card at the Westover branch, Kresh will be taking you questions about Arlington Public Library in the comments section from to p.m. Also please note that in addition to our normal comment policy, we ask that questions and comments be of a civil tone.

Richard Andrews, left, and Gregg Limley were among the 80 daters at the W. “(We) try to reconnect them with the library while they’re here, and hopefully they make a love connection too,” said Emily Getzschman, the library’s marketing manager.

Yolanda White of Omaha goes on a three-minute date during the Omaha Public Library's annual speed dating event at the W. About 80 people attended Sunday's speed dating event, which was for participants 45 and older.

John Adrian is no stranger to speed dating at the W. Last year some librarians persuaded him to attend the free, Valentine’s Day-inspired event.

He had recently gotten divorced and thought speed dating would be a low-stress way to meet new people, especially with the time constraint on each “date.”“It’s very difficult to make a fool out of yourself in three minutes,” he said.Prisbrey is quick to point out, however, that it’s really a way for young to meet — not necessarily a “dating” event, so women are finding women friends this way.Prisbrey describes how several women were actively engaged in an animated discussion at the end of one of the sessions, and it seemed clear that they were bonding.Single young professionals are invited to bring in a couple of books — whether favorites, disappointments, or yet-to-be-read titles — to be shared during timed, three-minute “book dates” with other single patrons. When asked where the idea for Shirlington’s book dating program came from, Librarian and Program Developer Mary Prisbrey laughs and says, “Although I’d like to say it was my idea, it actually wasn’t. I actually found the idea by Googling.” Prisbrey goes on to explain that she stumbled upon a similar program in Fargo, North Dakota while looking for ways to bring young people into the library.The event is intended to draw young people into the library while providing an opportunity for them to meet other singles in the area. Prisbrey has since been in touch with “Lacey,” the librarian who developed the program in Fargo, who admits that she didn’t actually create the idea either.So it’s anyone’s guess who “invented” the idea, and which library sponsored the first-ever book dating program. Prisbrey explains that it’s speed dating — each one-on-one session is timed for three to four minutes (although some people would like it to go longer) — and Prisbrey says she uses bells and whistles to enforce this time restriction.

892 Comments

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